Nawasa’s Community Water Storage Project

The main challenges

  • Schools were faced with school closures as a result of stoppage in supply throughout the state for varying reasons.
  • There were inadequate storage facilities at schools; as none of the schools have water tanks to assist NAWASA to provide them with a supply of water in the event of system down time or natural disasters.
  • Schools with inadequate water storage facilities were all Identified as hurricane shelters.
  • The Community relayed on the School for support with their water system when there were community events.

Implementing actors and responsibilities

  • To install emergency water storage to schools in Grenada
  • To increase water storage capacity to schools in Grenada

What actions were taken and should be highlighted?

  • 18 – 1000-gallon water storage tanks were installed at 17 schools on the tri-island state of Grenada.

What were the results of those actions?

  • Increased capacity to reduce risks to all hazards at 17 schools on the island
  • Ensure water availability and its sustainable use improved at 17 schools on the island

Major achievements

  • Improvement of piping systems within the School
  • Over 18,000 gallons of stored water available to 17 schools on the tri-island state of Grenada.
  • Four schools had their water supply network repaired.
  • Beneficiaries: 5728 plus students representing 17 public schools on the island; Male: 3170, Female: 2558

Overall, what is unique, interesting, or notable about this major achievement/case study?

  • This project is unique and notable because it fits within NAWASA’s strategic direction of sustainability and our ability to withstand seasonal challenges both in the rainy and dry season, for which storage is always a major challenge to Nawasa achieving those objects and it was one of the areas that we have significant deficiencies.
  • This project allowed us to address the critical challenge of storage at the school level bearing in mind that those same schools are used as shelters in a post-disaster situation. We were, therefore, providing resilience in the aftermath of a natural disaster.
  • This intervention allowed schools to remain open during periods of drought and also in cases when there were interruptions both in the dry and rainy season, students were able to continue their process of education. This intervention also allowed schools that are hurricane shelters to remain open and provide the needs of the community based on the emergency situation
  • In addition, this project was advanced by the National Disaster Management Agency NADMa but implemented by another government agency – NAWASA which was very positive.
  • It also highlighted a hazard like a drought which in some cases are not usually addressed but the sustainability component is very strong because the results that have emerged from this project can expand the beneficiaries beyond the initial project intervention
  • The assets generated from this project are being used by NAWASA in communities that are problematic to supply in the dry season and will become problematic in the aftermath of a natural disaster, there are dense pockets in high elevation. Tanks will be deployed in predetermined locations, filled by water trucks and persons in and around are able to address daily needs using buckets.

What are the next steps:

  • NAWASA maintains responsibility of the water tanks for the next three years.
  • NAWASA will be looking closely into the storage capacity of other government schools based on their population and will be working to ensure that adequate storage facilities are provided.

Project features

Years: 2018
Implementing Agency: National Water and Sewerage Authority Nawasa, National Disaster Management Agency
Benefiting Zone: Grenada
Cooperation and technical assistance: CDEMA
Funded by: The European Union through the Natural Disaster Risk Management Programme in the CARIFORUM.

Nawasa’s Community Water Storage Project. Download the PDF version

Strengthening Emergency Preparedness and Response in Moraikobai

The main challenges

Moraikobai has a history of hazard impact such as annual incidence of floods and droughts which affect livelihoods, health, and safety of the residents. The community’s main livelihood activities, farming, and logging are highly susceptible to climate-related hazard impact. Despite this, the community has little access to early warning mechanisms and there is no common plan for risk reduction. Further, the remote, riverine nature of the community delays response, thereby, perpetuating the Community’s cycle of risk.

Implementing actors and responsibilities

Through the “Strengthening Community Preparedness and Response in Moraikobai Region 5,” project, the Civil Defence Commission in partnership with the Caribbean Disaster Emergency Management Agency (CDEMA) through support from the European Union, aims to build resilience of one (1) of the most vulnerable communities in the Mahaica- Berbice, Administrative Region (Region 5). This is to be achieved through the development of a Community Based Disaster Risk Management (CBDRM) system which includes an assessment of disaster risk in the community, hazard maps, a CBDRM plan, the establishment of a Community Emergency Response Team (CERT) and a CBDRM Committee.

What actions were taken and should be highlighted?

The project which commenced in June 2018, has engaged the community in participatory risk management, through; risk assessments, including hazard, vulnerability and capacity mapping; risk reduction planning; capacity building in Community Emergency Response Team (CERT); and the establishment of a CBDRM committee.

What were the results of those actions?

There is increased awareness of and knowledge around disaster risk and risk reduction strategies among community members in Moraikobai.

Through capacity building in risk mapping and CERT, Moraikobai has increased capacity to prepare for and respond to climate-related hazard impact, particularly during upcoming seasonal events.

The above-mentioned outcomes have produced the following outputs and outcomes:

  • 28 residents have been trained to conduct risk assessments at the community level
  • 11 residents have been trained in CERT
  • Priority hazards have been identified for the community
  • Community generated hazard and vulnerability maps have been developed for Moraikobai
  • Risk reduction measures and key resource persons and agencies have been identified
  • Geographic Information Systems (GIS) data and drone imagery have been collected for generation of hazard and vulnerability maps
  • The community has an established CBDRM Committee

Major achievements

Moraikobai is the only indigenous and the only hinterland community within the Mahaica-Berbice Region (Region 5). From a development standpoint, the largely Arawak community is in the initial stages of developing its sustainable tourism sector and has used the CBDRM Committees and CERT as tools for propelling the local sector. For example the Village council has included the CERT team and CBDRM committee in project proposals for development of its tourism product. If successfully integrated this community can be a model for DRM integration in local tourism.

What are the next steps?

The main next steps involve the completion of the project are as follows:

  • The completion and distribution of the Morakaboi CBDRM Plan, inclusive of hazard and vulnerability maps.
  • A drill/simulation is to be done with the CERT and equipment handed over.
  • Integration of Moraikobai CBDRM system into the Mahaica-Berbice Regional Disaster Risk Management Systems and Monitoring

Project features

Years: 2018-2019
Implementing Agency: Civil Defence Commission, Moraikobai Village Council
Benefiting Zone: Guayana
Cooperation and technical assistance: CDEMA
Funded by: The European Union through the Natural Disaster Risk Management Programme in the CARIFORUM.

Strengthening Emergency Preparedness and Response in Moraikobai. Download the PDF version